« ocn_additional | トップページ | NHKオンデマンドプログラム »

2009年2月 9日 (月)

余録:「いきなり話の要点に入るのはとっても無作法…

(Mainichi Japan) February 9, 2009

Times change as Japan pushes for punctuality at U.N. Security Council

余録:「いきなり話の要点に入るのはとっても無作法…

A poem written by an American who visited Japan in the Meiji Period waxed wryly about "the Japanese way," in which rushing into the main topic of discussion is considered bad manners, negotiations are conducted leisurely from morning till night without haste, "right away" means a week later, and clocks all tell different times ...

 「いきなり話の要点に入るのはとっても無作法/交渉は日がな一日ゆっくりあわてず/『すぐに』が一週間のことをさす、独特の/のんびり、のん気な日本流/時計の動きはてんでんばらばら/報時の響きはそろわない……」

明治に来日した米国人が書いた「大ざっぱな時間の国」という詩である。今ではちょっと耳を疑うが、西本郁子さんの「時間意識の近代」(法政大学出版局)によると、幕末や明治の日本人はのんびりと時間にこだわらぬ人々だったらしい

Around the same time, a British guide to Japan explained that it was useless to get upset over things progressing so slowly in Japan, for an hour's delay unsettled no one and "soon" could mean anytime between now and Christmas. For many of you, such descriptions undoubtedly sound like descriptions of foreign countries in modern-day guides.

Hearing these views of Japan today, one is struck with a sense of disbelief. But according to Ikuko Nishimoto in her book, "Jikan ishiki no kindai: toki wa kane nari" no shakaishi" (The Modern Age of Time Consciousness: The Social History of "Time is Money") published by Hosei University Press, the Japanese at the end of the Tokugawa Period and into the Meiji were an easygoing bunch who never fussed about time.

「この国では物事はすぐ進まない。一時間そこいらは問題にならない。『すぐに』という意味の『タダイマ』は、今からクリスマスまでを意味することもある。怒っても無駄だ」とは英国の日本案内書だ。どこかよその国について書かれた現代のガイドを思い浮かべた方もいよう

The book offers details of the dramatic events that led to the transformation of the laidback Japanese people into one of the world's most restless and prompt. What reminded me of those twists and turns was the news that Japan, which assumed the position of U.N. Security Council chair this month, presented each of the Security Council's member nations with an atomic clock, urging strict punctuality.

こののんきな国民が、世界有数のせっかちで時間にうるさい国民に変身するまでの波乱のドラマは西本さんの本に詳しい。その紆余(うよ)曲折を思い出したのも、今月、国連安保理の議長国となった日本が各理事国に国産電波時計を贈って時間厳守を呼びかけたとの外電に接したからだ

The U.N. is a diverse collection of countries, some of which are a stickler for punctuality and others who may not care as much. Meetings are said to start 15 minutes behind schedule for the most part. So one wonders if a 15-minute delay is the global average in matters of punctuality?

それこそ時間に厳しい国からそうでない国までさまざまな国々の集まる国連である。会議は定刻を15分ぐらい遅れることが多いそうだが、世界平均するとその辺に落ち着くものなのか。

Japan's gift to its fellow member nations is fitting of a country that struggled to make the shift from a time-indifferent nation to an impatient one.

ここはのんびり派からせっかち派へ苦労して変身した国ならではの議長プレゼントといえそうだ

Let's hope it proves useful in the Security Council, where "time is peace" and "time is human life" can truly mean something.

なるほど「時は平和なり」「時は人命なり」の場面もある安保理だから、時計がそんなところで役立てばいい。

As for meetings that jump right to the point -- that all depends on Japan's capacity as the presiding chair. ("Yoroku," a front-page column in the Mainichi Shimbun)

ただ「いきなり話の要点に入る」議事運営は議長の力量次第だ。

|

« ocn_additional | トップページ | NHKオンデマンドプログラム »

02-英字新聞(毎日)」カテゴリの記事

コメント

コメントを書く



(ウェブ上には掲載しません)




« ocn_additional | トップページ | NHKオンデマンドプログラム »